Intrepid Landcare

Coming up – an event for the young and adventurous:

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Talking about Quolls

Are there quolls in the Strath Creek/Flowerdale area? If so, what do they look like, what are their habitat and food requirements, what is their life span and general behaviour and what threats do they face? All these questions and more will be answered at a talk about the Spotted-tailed Quoll at Kinglake West next Thursday evening. Full details are on the flyer below.

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Inaugural Landcare Celebration

On Sunday 16th December 2018 the Upper Goulburn Landcare Network will be holding what will hopefully be the first of an annual event celebrating Landcare, community and family.

This event is for Landcare members and their extended families. Come along and enjoy a day of fun, food, family and festivities!

We look forward to seeing lots of you there.
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Upcoming event

For those with orchards…

20180701 fruit Fly

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Focus on Foxes

20180422 Focus on Foxes

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It’s been and gone

Well the group’s AGM has been and gone. A great crowd turned out. Even some ex-Streakers (i.e. Strath Creekers) turned up. Sam Strong gave a great presentation on “How Myth and Language influence successful restoration and environmental management: Learning from two bushfires”, particularly pertinent to those in the room.

A new committee was elected and well, it looked very much like the old committee, just greyer, with a few position shuffles. John and Marilyn catered a fantastic lunch again and a good time was had by all.

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Susan King and Tom Tehan

Congratulations go to Susan King our new vice-president and winner of this year’s Em Tehan Cup for outstanding service to Strath Creek Landcare.

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The Queens are coming!

European Wasp 1-DSCN7650You would have to have been living under a rock not to have seen the impact of European Wasps on businesses, lifestyles and the environment in our valley over the last few years. First seen in Victoria in the 1970’s this import, native to Europe, Asia and North Africa, is unfortunately  here to stay. They form large nests which at the end of the season could number as many as 20,000 individuals.

European Wasps are very effective predators and scavengers and in their ever widening search for food kill or drive off many of the native invertebrates. They also eat fruit, garbage, human food and carrion.

20170821 life cycle

The photo above shows the typical life-cycle of the European Wasp. There are several key times when trapping can have beneficial effects in control the populations. One of those is now. As the weather warms up the queens come out of hibernation and take flight to build new nests. As one queen can produce thousands of workers, trapping the queen wasps at this stage (when there don’t appear to be many wasps around!) can have a huge payback.

At this stage of the lifecycle the unfertilised queens are looking for sugars to build fat over summer. Fruit is particular attractive. Simple traps can be built to catch them. The Murrindindi Shire Council has recommended (  http://bit.ly/2v0IwMl  ) using a plastic milk container, a piece of apple as the bait a mixture of honey, jam and vanilla essence to attract the wasps. The trick is not to trap the native wasps, flies and bees which are often beneficial pollinators and the honey bees. The vanilla deters the bees from the trap.

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Give it a try. You have nothing to lose and a lot to gain.

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